Lev Grossman
My Writing Spot

Amy Bloom

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In her craft talk this afternoon Amy Bloom cautioned us writers.  "If you want to do something well to public acclaim, then do something else.  Like embroidery.  I recommend cooking.  Everyone likes a good meal.  And they will praise you."

"I don't write to recommend or to improve the lives of my readers."  

"Writing is not the toughest job.  It is a privilege.  It can be agonizing, but it is a privilege."

She encouraged us to read the work aloud, because then we would see where we make mistakes.  I wanted to hit myself upside the head.  I know this already, because I'm a preacher.  How many times has something looked correct to me on the page, only to be altered when I read it aloud?  But, I haven't been reading my memoir aloud as I've written.  Yes, I've read a passage here and there, but not the entire manuscript.  Damn.  Now I've got 72,000 words to read aloud.  Maybe that's what Sebastian will be hearing for the next few months?

A theme of her talk and her Q&A was character.  She spoke of how writers are lazy.  They put in just a few descriptors, just enough to "brand" their character in order to show the reader that the writer and the reader are in on something together.  Instead the writer needs to think about their characters and see the world from their point-of-view and describe them as actual persons, for there are no types of persons.  "Be your characters, don't describe them."  Describing them is simply creating a cartoon.

She added, "It is a big world.  You have to see past your own frame."  Asked more specifically how to do this, she said "Bring everything you know to everything you have imagined."

I left the talk realizing that I need to go over every bit of my memoir and look at how I've dealt with the other characters.  A few are more fully formed than others, but I realized that there are places in the book where I was lazy in my descriptions.

Asked when she knows she is done with revising a book, because you have to stop sometime, even though there are always ways to improve and revise.  She answered, "When I'm lying bloody at the finish line.  Then, I try to go a little further, and you can see the marks of blood as I go a little further."  I also realized that I'm not yet lying bloody at the finish line with my book.

But I was encouraged by one thing she said.  Speaking of endings she said, "My goal for the ending is that it transforms the work by shining a different light on all that came before it."  That I think I've done.  I think my ending is kick ass.

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